The Influenza

The Spanish Influenza took a large toll on the Twin Ports region. Community events were canceled, schools were closed, and the papers printed stories almost daily about prominent residents who contracted the flu, and when local authorities believed things would return to normal.

Below are numerous articles and advertisements about what happened in the Superior area during the Spanish Influenza outbreak of 1918 and 1919. Click to enlarge images.

Mar 27, 1914 influenza

Well before the influenza that killed so many people across the globe, there were advertisements in the local newspaper about methods for treating the illness.1

 

In this article, the reports showed that the city was not faring well in light of the influenza. (Superior Telegram, Nov. 7, 1918.)

In this article, the reports showed that the city was not faring well in light of the influenza.2

 

This article was printed to let the public know that the flu bans would continue for several days. (Superior Telegram, Nov. 8 1918.)

This article was printed to let the public know that the flu bans would continue for several days. 3

 

This story explained when the Superior schools might re-open depending on the number of flu cases in the area. (Superior Telegram, Nov. 12, 1918.)

This story explained when the Superior schools might re-open depending on the number of flu cases in the area.4

 

The newspaper printed a story on a previous resident who got the influenza. (Superior Telegram, Nov. 12, 1918.)

The newspaper printed a story on a previous Superior resident who died from the influenza while living in California.5

 

Local reports on the status of the influenza were printed in the newspaper. (Superior Telegram, Nov, 12, 1918)

Local reports on the status of the influenza were printed in the newspaper.6

 

Another article explains that area schools can re-open. (Superior Telegram. November 13, 1918. Superior Public Library.)

Another article explains that area schools can re-open.7

The Normal School's newspaper, The Peptomist, started printing shortly after the war. An article from Feb 15, 1920, "Influenza on Wane at the School" explains how the school fared through the influenza pandemic. (University Archives, UW-Superior Special Collections.)

The Normal School’s newspaper, “The Peptomist,” started printing shortly after the war. An article from Feb. 15, 1920, “Influenza on Wane at the School” explains how the school fared through the influenza pandemic.8

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1Superior Telegram, March 27, 1914. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
2Superior Telegram,, Nov. 7, 1918. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
3Superior Telegram, Nov. 8 1918. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
4Superior Telegram, Nov. 12, 1918. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
5Superior Telegram, Nov. 12, 1918. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
6Superior Telegram, Nov. 12, 1918. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
7Superior Telegram, Nov. 13, 1918. Superior Public Library, Superior Wisconsin. Microfilm.
8 “Influenza on Wane at the School,” Peptomist, Feb 15, 1920. University Archives, UW-Superior Special Collections.